News

Icelandic Nightlife

12.03.2015

Over the last decade Reykjavik's nightlife has been hyped up. Reykjavik, however, is a small city and those arriving expecting to find a large-scale 'Ibiza of the North' may be a little disappointed as most of the action takes place in a very small central area. Having said that, the scene on the weekends, especially in summer, is surprisingly raucous for such a small city, as revellers flit between bars on the traditional runtur (pub crawl).

The Blue Lagoon

12.03.2015

Iceland's most popular visitor attraction, the Blue Lagoon is a giant bathtub that pools six million litres of geothermal seawater from 2000 metres beneath the earth's surface. By the time it reaches the lagoon, the mineral-rich milky, aqua blue waters simmer at temperatures between 37 and 39°C. In addition to the lagoon, there's a sauna, steam bath carved out of a lava cave and a massaging waterfall. A shop, café and viewing deck keeps spectators amused.

Icelandic Volcanoes

12.03.2015

Iceland has many active and inactive volcanoes (about 130 all together!) due to it being situated on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Basically, the country is on the middle-top of two tectonic plates and has 30 active volcanic systems running through the island.

People of Iceland

08.03.2015

Iceland will welcome you, if not by it's natural beauty, then for sure by it's friendly population. With fewer than 400.000 residents, Iceland still holds the title for the biggest small nation on Earth. It is no wonder people from all over the world flock here by the thousands every year. 

The Northern Lights

08.03.2015

The aurora borealis, otherwise known as the Northern Lights, is one of the finest sights in nature. It is caused by electrically charged particles emitted by the sun and interacting with the earth's magnetic field. Some particles (chiefly electrons) are accelerated towards the earth and guided towards two zones, one near the north pole, the other near the south pole. Colliding with the upper atmosphere at very great speeds, the particles cause the air to glow in the beautiful colours of the aurora.
 

Glaciers

08.03.2015

About 11% of the land area of Iceland is covered by glaciers. Iceland has 269 named glaciers of almost all types: ice caps, outlet glaciers, mountain glaciers, alpine, piedmont and cirque glaciers, ice streams ...
By far the largest of Iceland's ice caps is Vatnajokull with an area of 8,300 sq. km, equal in size to all the glaciers on the European mainland put together - or 3 times the size of Luxembourg or Rhode Island. Iceland has a longer than 300-year history of observations by Icelanders on the country's glaciers.